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Posts Tagged News

The Girl Effect: PAGE program empowers through education

Female novelist Ayn Rand once wrote “The question isn’t who’s going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me.”

In it’s fourth year, The Partnership for Appalachian Girls Education (PAGE) program returns to Madison County this summer empowering young women through education.

“It’s an amazing place and an incredible opportunity that these girls get to have,”said Mariana Zindel, Duke University undergraduate. “I feel so lucky to be able to be here and to actually make a difference in someone’s life.”

Read the full article from The News-Record and Sentinal [PDF]

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This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)

Trust Foundation announces a $15,000 gift to support “Homegrown and Healthy” farm-to-table and entrepreneurial initiative for rural Appalachian girls.

The middle school girls enrolled in PAGE, Partnership for Appalachian Girls’ Education, know a lot about farming. Many live in remote rural communities in Madison County, North Carolina – known for its beautiful and rugged mountain landscapes. Their elders always had small family farms, some with pigs, cows, and chickens. But farm-to-table eating in a school setting is much less familiar. Thanks to a gift from Trust Foundation by the Haddock family of Central Florida and Spring Creek, North Carolina, that’s about to change.

With a gift of $5,000 and a matching gift of $10,000, rural girls attending PAGE’s six-week summer program will now have the chance to enjoy meals cooked with organic farm foods grown in the rich soil of their own county. The girls enrolled in this intensive summer program spend six weeks in the summer learning digital literacy skills, reading book titles ranging from The Hunger Games to Jane Eyre, and learning about leadership from Duke University undergraduates. The goal is to help girls from rural Appalachia have the chance to excel in middle and high school, and to create new college and career pathways.

Trust Foundation’s gift will allow PAGE to work with local organic farmers to bring homegrown, healthy food into the summer program and its
curriculum. The PAGE girls will enjoy fresh pizzas made with vegetables from Mountain Harvest Organic farm in Spring Creek and eggs and traditional “sausage biscuits” made with fresh, local foods. The “Homegrown and Healthy” project will also take girls to the farms supplying their summer food, to teach them about the health and economic benefits of eating local.

The Haddocks’ gift will have an added benefit: Older PAGE students will create their own small business involving local food resources. A Homegrown Entrepreneurship project will allow girls entering grades 8/9 to learn firsthand about how to be rural entrepreneurs in a county struggling with job loss and yet rich local food resources.

“I can’t wait to eat food from around the county,” says Faith Loflin, an 8th Springs who will be in PAGE’s summer program. “Since PAGE launched in 2010, we have dreamed of serving local Madison County foods to our students,” says PAGE Executive Director, Deborah Hicks. Now this dream is about to come true, and we’ll also have the chance to teach middle school girls about being rural entrepreneurs. This is a big step toward helping girls achieve life-long health and economic benefits from the resources on their own family farms.”

The Haddocks’ gift presents a challenge: to raise $10,000 in matching funds. Donors who wish to help PAGE meet this challenge or wish to learn more can do so by visiting our Get Involved page.

Download the full press release here: PAGE Press Release: Homegrown and Healthy (PDF)

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This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)

How More Appalachian Girls Will Tell Stories Because Of Open Source Software

Jacie Buckner and Alexis Wills are teenagers. Both grew up in the same Appalachian region of North Carolina. Jacie describes herself as quiet. Alexis says she is a rebel. They met in middle school, when they ran into each other in the lunchroom. ” I looked at Jacie and thought ‘oh my goodness, she’s going to hate me!’”Alexis says.

The two bonded over a shared background of farming. One day Jacie’s grandfather had an accident. He died and the family was stunned “I couldn’t talk about it, we were in shock,” Jacie says. But Alexis was one of the ones who understood. The two talked together. Jacie told stories of her grandfather and cried with her friend.

And then, exactly one year later, in a strange twist of fate, Alexis’s “Paw-Paw” died on the anniversary of Jacie’s loss.

The two used video to tell their story.

Read the full article on WUNC’s site.

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This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)

VISTA Elizabeth McIntosh helps Appalachian girls dream new stories with PAGE

Though originally from sunny Winter Park, Florida, NC Campus Compact VISTA Elizabeth McIntosh is no stranger to the Appalachian mountains. Elizabeth’s mother runs a summer camp for girls, Camp Glen Arden, in Tuxedo, NC, where Elizabeth has spent every summer of her life. Now Elizabeth works just 70 miles from Tuxedo in Madison County, and is following in her mother’s footsteps.

In partnership with the Madison County School system, Elizabeth works with PAGE, the Partnership for Appalachian Girls Education, a project with a mission to foster 21st century literacy, social equity, and economic opportunity for Appalachian girls and young women. PAGE was founded in 2010 and has since hosted 50 girls (grade 6-9) in their summer camp program. Elizabeth officially began her year of AmeriCorps service in August of 2013 as PAGE’s first VISTA member, but she had previously worked with the organization’s summer camp through a Duke University internship in 2012, and then as part of the strategic development committee from 2012-2013.

Read the full article on NC Campus Compact Vista’s website: http://nccampuscompactvista.blogspot.com/2014/03/vista-elizabeth-mcintosh-helps.html

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This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)

Press Release: Open Source Software Opening Educational Doors in Appalachia

For Immediate Release
Elizabeth McIntosh
eliz.mcintosh@gmail.com
(828) 649-9276 ex. 229

Open Source Software Opening Educational Doors in Appalachia

MADISON COUNTY, N.C., March 13, 2014 – The Partnership for Appalachian Girls’ Education (PAGE) announces today that it will use open source technology alternatives Kdenlive and Blender to document and edit their digital stories. Historically, PAGE participants used Final Cut Pro in the digital learning lab, but these open source alternatives offer a good user experience, “without the heavy scale-up costs associated with non open-source solutions.”

As with most non-profits, PAGE faces funding challenges as it aims to fulfill its mission of delivering innovative and out-of-school learning opportunities for adolescent girls and young women in Appalachia. And as PAGE continues to grow, the heavy scale-up costs associated with software such as Final Cut Pro is hindering PAGE from fulfilling its mission. Therefore, open source alternatives allow the students to rapidly learn the technology but at a price that everyone can afford.

“Creating a digital learning lab can be a costly task, especially in an economically distressed region such as Madison County, North Carolina. Open source has made educational opportunities possible for Appalachian girls, opening doors wider than would be otherwise possible and helping to spread the mission of the Partnership for Appalachian Girls’ Education.”

Read the whole article: http://opensource.com/education/14/3/open-source-opening-educational-doors-appalachia

More about PAGE:

PAGE was founded to promote 21st century educational opportunities, social equity and economic opportunity for Appalachian girls and young women. Its goal is to help adolescent girls in rural Appalachia enjoy success while they are in middle and high school and create futures that include graduation and college. The program offers mentoring to help girls envision pathways from middle school to college and a career, and a digital learning lab that melds one of the oldest Appalachian traditions—storytelling—with 21st century skills. With the girls’ rich heritage of ballad singing and storytelling, digital stories can introduce them to the world of technology while linking this world to their rich past. The PAGE digital learning lab allows these girls to embrace new technology as they find their voices in a wider world. For more about PAGE and to watch some of the girls’ stories, visit the PAGE’s website: http://www.carolinapage.org.

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This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)

Empowering lives through literacy

When Jacie Buckner and Alexis Wills met in middle school, they didn’t know that a random encounter over ice cream would blossom into a life changing friendship.

Since meeting again at the Partnership for Appalachian Girls’ Education (PAGE), the the quiet Jacie and the self-described “rebel” Alexis have bonded over school, fun sleepovers, and the deaths of their beloved grandfathers.

Fourteen-year-old Buckner of Laurel and 14-year-old Wills of Spring Creek shared their story in a collaborative “digital
story,” a short movie about their lives. Their story, “More than a Friendship,” was shown Tuesday, July 23, as part of the final
exhibition for the PAGE summer enrichment program.

Read the full article (PDF)

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This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)Stories - The Partnership for Appalachian Girl's Education (PAGE)